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Lesson Plan – WebQuest: How Can We Protect the Wetlands?

http://jsgutierrezny.tripod.com/webquestwetlands.htm

Teacher Name: Jacqueline Gutierrez

Type of Lesson: WebQuest

Lesson Plan Title: WebQuest: How Can We Protect the Wetlands?

Discipline and Topic: Science - Earth Science/Ecology

Target Population and Grade Level: 7th grade science students

Population Characteristics: The students are enrolled in a seventh grade general science class that is working on a unit that introduces students to environmental protection.  This lesson will be done with classes of regular students and Honors students.

Lesson Groupings: Students work in pairs of two students per computer.

Objectives:

* Students will discover and research at least six different animals and plants that live in the wetlands

* Students will research and compile information about the wetlands ecosystem

* Students will be able to explain the need for wetlands conservation to others via a PowerPoint presentation

* Use computers to search the Internet

* Use communications & computing technologies to locate information efficiently

* Brainstorm a range of information sources to meet a specific information need

* Use online information resources for research

* Synthesize information from nonprint media

* Demonstrate an understanding of the effects technological changes have on society & the workplace

* Use nonprint media to communicate

Materials: computers with internet connections, PowerPoint, MS Word

Timing: Ideally, students will be given three 45-minute periods in the computer lab to complete this lesson.  Otherwise, the WebQuest will need to be completed using computers in the library or at home.  These students are already familiar with the programs MS Word and MS PowerPoint. 

Scope and Sequence: 

1) A few days before starting this WebQuest, students will go on a fieldtrip to the Alley Pond Environmental Center, where they can observe several native wetlands plants and animals. 

2) The class would meet at the computer lab for three days for this activity. The lesson will be conducted during three 45-minute periods spread over two weeks.

3) Students will work in groups of two.  They will log into their computer terminals and go to the website: http://jsgutierrezny.tripod.com/webquestwetlands.htm.

5) Each student will follow the instructions given online.

6) Each student will gather, organize, analyze, and evaluate information related to protecting the wetlands environment.

7) Students will work in the same groups of two to prepare 10-minute PowerPoint presentations.

8) Wrap-up and class presentations.

Note: Students are also being graded on how well they work through the activity with their partners as well as the contents of their presentations.

Credits and References:

1) Wetlands Protect Us All - Wetlands - Sierra Club, http://www.sierraclub.org/wetlands/factsheets/protect.asp

Evaluation of Students:

Student performance will be evaluated based on the rubric below.  Each team member will receive his or own grade, based on group work, ideas, the presentation, and effort.

To evaluate the lesson, I would walk around the computer lab to see how students are progressing and ask them questions about the activity.  I would try to pace the students so the activity could be finished within three 45-minute periods, as computer lab time is precious.  I would let students know that they should be working on the PowerPoint presentations during our third computer lab.  The completed worksheets will be collected and PowerPoint presentations presented to the class.  I would also take into account the understanding of wetlands conservation showed during the wrap-up. 

Students will receive between 1-4 points for each objective achieved based on the rubric below.   The rubric will be used to grade the project as follows:

A = 28-32 points, B = 22-27 points, C = 17-21 points, D = 11-16 points, F = 10 or fewer points

1

2

3

4

Score

Students will show an understanding of why wetlands conservation is desirable.

Students will not be able to describe the advantages of wetlands conservation.

Students will describe the advantages of wetlands conservation in one to two sentences.

Students will describe the advantages of wetlands conservation in three sentences.

Students will describe the advantages of wetlands conservation in four or more sentences.

Students will be able to describe various animals and plants that live in the wetlands and how to protect them.

Many descriptions are incorrect and there is no apparent evidence of critical thinking.

Some descriptions are incorrect and there is very little evidence critical thinking has occurred. At least two sentences have been written.

Most descriptions are correct. Some critical thinking has occurred. At least three sentences have been written.

The descriptions are correct. Critical thinking skills are evident. There are at least four well-written sentences.

Students will interpret and synthesize information from nonprint media as demonstrated by being able to go through the website and to complete the worksheet.

Students will not know how to interpret synthesize information from nonprint media.

Students will interpret and synthesize some of the information from nonprint media.

Students will interpret and synthesize most of the information from nonprint media.

Students will interpret and synthesize all the information from nonprint media as demonstrated by being able to go through the website and to complete the worksheet.

Participation

No one took responsibility for the PowerPoint presentation.

One member of the group leads the entire presentation.

Both members of the group presented only part of the material.

All students participated equally in the presentation and presented all the material.

1

PowerPoint Presentation Clarity

No organization, clarity, or opinions.

Presentation was not well organized - thoughts and opinions are unclear.

Presentation was somewhat clear. Some ideas and opinions need to be refined.

Presentation was clear and to the point. Ideas and opinions are well prepared.

Time Length of PowerPoint Presentation

Between 0 and 4 minutes or more than 20 minutes.

Between 3 and 6 minutes or 13 and 17 minutes

Between 6 and 9 minutes or 11 and 13 minutes

Between 9 and 11 minutes

Students will be able to use PowerPoint to illustrate why the wetlands should be protected using examples and visual aids.

No visual aides such as photographs and/or animations were used in the presentation.

The presentation did not encourage wetlands conservation.

The visual aids such as photographs and/or animations were briefly referred to in the presentation and needed more work.

The presentation slightly encouraged wetlands conservation.

Appropriate visual aides such as photographs and/or animations were used in the presentation.

The presentation somewhat encouraged wetlands conservation.

Organized and appropriate visual aides such as photographs and/or animations incorporated into the presentation.

The presentation strongly encouraged wetlands conservation.

Students will work cooperatively using technology as evidenced by completion of the activities.

Students will not move along and will get stuck, constantly asking for help.  They will not be able to work cooperatively in their assigned groups of two.

Students will ask for occasional help before moving on to the next task.  They will have trouble sharing the computer terminal.

Students will seldom ask for occasional help before moving on to the next task.  They will have very little trouble sharing the computer terminal.

Students will move from step to step on their own and at their own pace. Students will work cooperatively using technology as evidenced by completion of the activities.

Curriculum Links:

Intermediate Level Science, Core Curriculum, Grades 5-8, The University Of The State Of New York, The State Education Department,  http://www.nysed.gov,

Key Idea 3: Individual organisms and species change over time., PERFORMANCE

INDICATOR 3.1, Describe sources of variation in organisms and their structures and relate the variations to survival., 3.1b Changes in environmental conditions can affect the survival of individual organisms with a particular trait. Small differences between parents and offspring can accumulate in successive generations so that descendants are very different from their ancestors. Individual organisms with certain traits are more likely to survive and have offspring than individuals without those traits.

Key Idea 6: Plants and animals depend on each other and their physical environment., PERFORMANCE INDICATOR 6.1, Describe the flow of energy and matter through food chains and food webs., PERFORMANCE INDICATOR 6.2, Provide evidence that green plants make food and explain the significance of this process to

other organisms.,

Key Idea 7: Human decisions and activities have had a profound impact on the physical and living environment.

PERFORMANCE INDICATOR 7.1, Describe how living things, including humans, depend upon the living and nonliving environment for their survival. PERFORMANCE

INDICATOR 7.2, Describe the effects of environmental changes on humans and other populations.

National Science Education Standards, http://www.nap.edu/readingroom/books/nses/3.html#ts

TEACHING STANDARD A: Teachers of science plan an inquiry-based science program for their students., TEACHING STANDARD B: Teachers of science guide and facilitate learning., TEACHING STANDARD D: Teachers of science design and manage learning environments that provide students with the time, space, and resources needed for learning science., TEACHING STANDARD E: Teachers of science develop communities of science learners that reflect the intellectual rigor of scientific inquiry and the attitudes and social values conducive to science learning.

Last updated on July 22, 2007 .